Archive for the ‘holidays’ Category

Year of the Rabbit

January 23, 2023

Year of the Rabbit

Happy Lunar New Year (Spring Festival). It’s the Year of the Rabbit in China, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore, the Philippines, Taiwan, and Korea, but the Year of the Cat in Vietnam. Either way, the holday lasts until the Lantern Festival on February 5th. If that’s not enough partying for you, the Mongolian Lunar New Year is February 21st (same for Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan, and parts of India). It’s the Year of the Rabbit (“Water Hare”) there, too.

More:

“Lunar New Year: What to expect as we hop into the Year of the Rabbit,” Adela Suliman, Washington Post

“From Chinese to Tibetan, all the most delicious Lunar New Year dishes explained,” Eileen Cho, NBC News

“While many ring in the Year of the Rabbit, Vietnam celebrates the cat,”Suzanne Nuyen, NPR News

“All you need to know about the Year of the Rabbit,” Brian Wang, South China Morning Post

Note: Japan hasn’t celebrated Lunar New Year since 1873.

Update:

“For the first time, the White House celebrates the Lunar New Year,” Simon Druker, UPI

__________________
Shortlink: https://wp.me/p6sb6-CXR

Top Image (“Lunar Year of the Rabbit, after Georges-Louis Leclerc”) by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Dr. King on the Roots of Economic Inequality

January 16, 2023

Dr. King on the Roots of Economic Inequality

Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) planned a Poor People’s Campaign for May 1968 to demand jobs, unemployment insurance, a fair minimum wage, affordable housing, and education for poor adults and children, an Economic Bill of Rights. The effort was to involve poor people of all races from all parts of the country, urban and rural, but the historical roots of racial economic disparity could not be ignored:

“At the very same time that America refused to give the Negro any land, through an act of Congress our government was giving away millions of acres of land in the West and the Midwest, which meant that it was willing to undergird its white peasants from Europe with an economic floor.

But not only did they give the land, they built land grant colleges with government money to teach them how to farm. Not only that, they provided county agents to further their expertise in farming. Not only that, they provided low interest rates in order that they could mechanize their farms.

Not only that, today many of these people are receiving millions of dollars in federal subsidies not to farm, and they are the very people telling the black man that he ought to lift himself by his own bootstraps.”

— Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr., “Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution,” delivered at the National Cathedral, Washington DC on March 31, 1968 (full text here).

Related:

“Four ways Martin Luther King Jr. wanted to battle inequality,” Ned Resnikoff, MSNBC

“MLK called out income inequality,” James C. Harrington, Houston Chronicle

“American Dream Deferred: Wealth of Richest 400 Equals that of Nation’s 44 Million African Americans,” David Harris-Gershon,Tikkun Daily

“For women, economic justice a civil rights issue,” Maya L. Harris,CNN

“Martin Luther King’s Case for a Guaranteed Basic Income,” Matthew Yglesias, Slate

“Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Solution to Poverty,” Jordan Weissmann, The Atlantic

“Martin Luther King Jr. Celebrations Overlook His Critiques of Capitalism and Militarism,” Zaid Jilani, The Intercept

“How the 1% profit off of racial economic inequality,” Dedrick Asante-Muhammad and Chuck Collins, Guardian

______________________
Short link:  https://wp.me/p6sb6-CDA

Top photo (Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, on the Tidal Basin, Washington DC, Sculptor: Lei Yixin) by Mike Licht. Download a copy here.

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

New Year’s Resolution

January 1, 2023

“New Year’s Resolution,” written by Randle CatronWilla Dean “Deanie” Parker, and Mary Frierson; recorded by Otis Redding and Carla Thomas in 1968.

_____________
Short link: https://wp.me/p6sb6-Csd

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

 

After New Years Eve

January 1, 2023

“After New Years Eve,” written by James Sheppard and William Miller, recorded by The Heartbeats, 1957.

________________
Short link: hhttps://wp.me/p6sb6-Cs0

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

 

This Is the New Year

January 1, 2023

“This Is the New Year,” written by Ian Axel and performed by him with Chad King as A Great Big World. in 2012. Video director: Leiv Parton.

_____________
Short link: https://wp.me/p6sb6-CrW

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

 

Auld Lang Syne Boogie

January 1, 2023

“Auld Lang Syne Boogie,” recorded by the jump blues band of sax player Freddie Mitchell in 1949. Rip Harrington is on piano.

_____________
Short link: https://wp.me/p6sb6-CrR

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

 

Corrido de Auld Lang Syne

January 1, 2023

“Corrido de Auld Lang Syne” by Little Bobby Rey and his Band, an early LA Chicano pop band (also called “The Masked Phantom Band”) in about 1960. “Corrido” here means the music is in a galloping rhythm. Mr. Rey learned the saxophone from Earl Bostic.

_____________

Short link: https://wp.me/p6sb6-CrM

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

 

Auld Lang Syne

January 1, 2023

“Auld Lang Syne,” lyrics written by Robert Burns in 1788, set to a traditional tune, rendered by The Real McKenzies, a Canadian Celtic Punk band, with Gord Taylor on the highland pipes.

_____________
Short link: https://wp.me/p6sb6-CrH

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

 

Auld Lang Syne

January 1, 2023

“Auld Lang Syne,” by Guy Lombardo & his Royal Canadians, recorded in 1947. A familiar sound to baby boomers, since this band appeared on the live New Year’s Eve telecasts of the “ball drop” in Times Square in the Fifties, Sixties, and early Seventies. The band had filled the same role on radio, starting in 1929.

More:

“Do Americans Sing ‘Auld Lang Syne’ Because of a Frat Party?,” April White, Atlas Obscura

________________
Short link: https://wp.me/p6sb6-CrC

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Alone On New Year’s Eve

December 31, 2022

“Alone On New Year’s Eve,” written by Winfred “Blue” Lovett, recorded him with his group, The Manhattans, in 1966. Get out your hankies.

Related:

“I promise: no one dies alone because they didn’t get a kiss on New Year’s Eve,” Jen Doll, The Guardian

_____________

Short link: https://wp.me/p6sb6-Cre

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.