Posts Tagged ‘history’

Labor Day

September 7, 2020

“Every dollar that the boss did not work for, one of us worked for a dollar and didn’t get it.”

William “Big Bill” Haywood

Related:

“What Is Labor Day? A History of the Workers’ Holiday,” Karen Zraick, New York Times

“Most Americans view unions favorably, though few workers belong to one,” Drew DeSilver, Pew Research Center

“Unions struggle in the courts, but they have a fighting chance in the streets,” Barry Eidlin, Washington Post

“Trump Celebrates Labor Day by Attacking Labor Leader,” Benjamin Hart, New York Magazine

“Trump rolls back worker safety rules,” Ian Kullgren, Politico

“Donald Trump’s war on workers,” Paul Waldman, Washington Post

“A Labor Day Reflection on Unions, Race, and Division,” Dan Kaufman, The New Yorker

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The Hidden Life of Rosa Parks

August 28, 2020

Graphics studio Eido, director Joash Berkeley, and Cornell University’s  Riché Richardson created this short animated film about civil rights icon Rosa Parks.

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Southern Socialites’ Alternative History Campaign

August 17, 2020

The United Daughters of the Confederacy pushed the “Lost Cause” movement, revising history to reinterpret the South after the American Civil War. These women from elite antebellum families used their social, financial,  and political clout to pressure local governments to erect monuments to Confederate heroes. They formed textbook review committees to determine what Southern schoolchildren learned about the war, indoctinating children about the Confederate cause, ensuring that generations grew up as segregationists. A Vox video.

Related:

“The Secret History of America’s Worthless Confederate Monuments,” Kate Wagner, The New Republic

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How Isaac Newton spent his year in quarantine

August 14, 2020

When the plague hit England in 1665, Cambridge University sent students away and didn’t offer Zoom classes. Isaac Newton explains how he spent his time back home.

More:

“During a pandemic, Isaac Newton had to work from home, too. He used the time wisely.” Gillian Brockell, Washington Post

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Housing Segregation in America: A Short History

August 6, 2020

NPR’s Gene Demby explores the history of housing segregation in America for Code Switch.

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How Modern Policing Developed

July 23, 2020

Lewis Waller argues that the modern police force is rooted in Jeremy Bentham’s views on crime and deterrence, and the means of the powerful to protect themselves and their property.

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Frederick Douglas, July 4, 2020

July 3, 2020

Frederick Douglas, July 4, 2020

“Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe.”
Frederick Douglass (ca. 1818 — 1895), a speech on the twenty-fourth anniversary of Emancipation in the District of Columbia, Washington, D.C. (April 1886)

This year, descendents of Frederick Douglass read his powerful 1852 Independence Day speech “What To The Slave Is The Fourth Of July?”

Related:

“How Black Lives Matter transformed the Fourth of July,” Peniel Joseph, CNN

“How Black Americans Co-opted the Fourth of July,” Livia Gershon, JSTOR Daily

African American Fourth of July

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Top image (“Frederick Douglass, July 4, 2020” after an 1856 Ambrotype in the National Portrait Gallery) by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

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Belgian King ‘Regrets’ Atrocities of Ancestor, the ‘Snake of the Congo”

July 1, 2020
Belgian King Apologizes for Ancestor, the 'Snake of the Congo

Image: “King Leopold II of Belgium, Snake of the Congo,” Edward Linley Sambourne, Punch, 1906

On Tuesday, the 60th anniversary of the independence of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Belgian King Philippe expressed his regrets to DRC President Félix Tshisekedi for the atrocities commited by King Leopold II, who held the Congo as a personal fiefdom from 1885 to 1908 and killed approximately 10 million of its people, many of whom were maimed and tortured. King Philippe didn’t actually apologize.

The atrocities comitted under King Leopold II were documented by African American missionary William Henry Sheppard, who brought a Kodak camera to the Congo in 1900. The “regrets” of King Philippe were motivated by Belgium’s ongoing Black Lives Matter protests which targeted the country’s many monuments to King Leopold II and his generals.

“Beside Leopold, Nero, Caligula, Attilo, Torquemada, Genghis Khan and such killers of men are mere amateurs.” Mark Twain, New York World, December 3, 1905.

More:

“Belgium’s King Sends Letter of Regret Over Colonial Past in Congo,” Monika Pronczuk and Megan Specia, New York Times

“Belgian king expresses ‘deepest regrets’ for brutal colonial rule,” Jennifer Rankin and Jason Burke, The Guardian

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Bessie Coleman, Daredevil Aviatrix

June 26, 2020

In 1921, Bessie Coleman became the first black woman to earn a pilot’s license. U.S. flying schools had refused to teach her, so she learned French and, with sponsorship from the The Chicago Defender, earned her license from France’s Caudron Brothers School of Aviation. Ms. Coleman toured American as a stunt pilot, appearing in air shows as Queen Bess and Brave Bessie.

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How animation got real

June 23, 2020

Cartoon figures’ movements became more fluid and natural after Max Fleischer invented the Rotoscope. Vox’s Phil Edwards explains.

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