Posts Tagged ‘history’

When White Supremacists Overthrew a Government

September 10, 2019

In 1898 thousands of white supremacists expelled the leaders of Wilmington, North Carolina, destroyed black-owned businesses and properties, and killed an unknown number of black residents. A Vox video, produced by Ranjani Chakraborty.

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Labor Day

September 2, 2019

“Every dollar that the boss did not work for, one of us worked for a dollar and didn’t get it.”

William “Big Bill” Haywood

Related:

“What Is Labor Day? A History of the Workers’ Holiday,” Karen Zraick, New York Times

“Most Americans view unions favorably, though few workers belong to one,” Drew DeSilver, Pew Research Center

“Unions struggle in the courts, but they have a fighting chance in the streets,” Barry Eidlin, Washington Post

“Trump Celebrates Labor Day by Attacking Labor Leader,” Benjamin Hart, New York Magazine

“Trump rolls back worker safety rules,” Ian Kullgren, Politico

“Donald Trump’s war on workers,” Paul Waldman, Washington Post

“A Labor Day Reflection on Unions, Race, and Division,” Dan Kaufman, The New Yorker

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Operation Dragoon

August 29, 2019

Operation Dragoon was the Allied invasion of occupied Southern France during World War II. Troops from France’s African and Carribean colonial garrisons took part, and thousands of them died. Their contrubution has been largely ignored, until now.

More:

“France commemorates its ‘forgotten’ African veterans,” Christina Okello, RFI

“African leaders join Macron at commemoration of WWII landings in Provence,” France 24

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House of the Future, Past

August 20, 2019

Buckminster Fuller designed the Dymaxion House in 1927 as “the home of the future.” The only surviving prototype of Fuller’s vision, located at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, was meant to be a model of an affordable, mass-produced residence, but the design never caught on.

More:

“What are the lessons from Bucky Fuller’s Dymaxion House?” Lloyd Alter, Treehugger

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The Invasion of America

August 12, 2019

“The story of Native American dispossession is too easily swept aside, but new visualisations should make it unforgettable.

Between 1776 and the present, the United States seized some 1.5 billion acres from North America’s native peoples, an area 25 times the size of the United Kingdom. Many Americans are only vaguely familiar with the story of how this happened. They perhaps recognise Wounded Knee and the Trail of Tears, but few can recall the details and even fewer think that those events are central to US history.”

— “The invasion of America,” Claudio Saunt, Aeon

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Juneteenth

June 19, 2019

Juneteenth
(General Orders, Department of Texas, June 19, 1865)

On June 19, 1865 Union general Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston and issued General Order Number 3, which began: “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.” This ended the legal institution of chattel slavery in the United States, two years after Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation.

More:

“Juneteenth: Our Other Independence Day,” Kenneth C. Davis, Smithsonian.com

“Juneteenth,” Teresa Palomo Acosta, Handbook of Texas Online

“Juneteenth,” Stephanie Hall, Folklife Today

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500 years: The World’s Most Populous Cities

June 11, 2019

John Burns-Murdoch of the Financial Times created this population visualization of the 10 largest cities in the world for the last five centuries.

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How People Ate in Medieval England

May 30, 2019

 

“How People Ate in Medieval England,” a video exploration from Modern History TV by Jason Kingsley and Chris Carr.

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American Expansion, Month by Month

May 13, 2019

Month by month, colony by colony, state by state: An animated map of the contiguous United States shows every boundary change since 1629. a video by EarthDirect. Map data from the Newberry Library’s Atlas of Historical County Boundaries.

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DC Emancipation Day, 1862: It Was Slaveowners Who Got Reparations.

April 16, 2019

DC Emancipation Day, 1862: It Was Slaveowners Who Got Reparations.

On April 16, 1862, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln signed an act freeing the 3000 enslaved people in the District of Columbia. This was nine months before he signed the Emancipation Proclamation freeing slaves in the Confederate states, many of whom actually remained in bondage until the the war’s end in 1865, and 20 months before ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment, which definitively outlawed slavery everywhere in the United States.

Understandably, April 16th is a holiday in the District of Columbia, District Emancipation Day, celebrated with speeches, concerts, fireworks and parades. There’s a bit of rain on that parade, though, if you take a closer look at history. That 1862 act was called the Compensated Emancipation Act, and it authorized payments to DC slaveowners rather than liberation of enslaved people on moral grounds. It even sought to promote emigration of former slaves outside the borders of the United States.

In any case, black Washingtonians had their freedom. That’s definitely worth celebrating.

More:

“When Slaveowners Got Reparations,” Tera W. Hunter, New York Times

Related:

“Georgetown students vote in favor of reparations for enslaved people,” Susan Svrluga, Washington Post

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Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

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