Posts Tagged ‘holiday’

DC Emancipation Day, 1862: It Was Slaveowners Who Got Reparations.

April 16, 2021

DC Emancipation Day, 1862: It Was Slaveowners Who Got Reparations.

On April 16, 1862, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln signed an act freeing the 3000 enslaved people in the District of Columbia. This was nine months before he signed the Emancipation Proclamation freeing slaves in the Confederate states, many of whom actually remained in bondage until the the war’s end in 1865, and 20 months before ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment, which definitively outlawed slavery everywhere in the United States.

Understandably, April 16th is a holiday in the District of Columbia, District Emancipation Day, traditionally celebrated with speeches, concerts, fireworks and parades. There’s a bit of rain on that parade, though, if you take a closer look at history. That 1862 act was called the Compensated Emancipation Act, and it authorized payments to DC slaveowners rather than liberation of enslaved people on moral grounds. It even sought to promote emigration of former slaves outside the borders of the United States.

In any case, black Washingtonians had their freedom. That’s definitely worth celebrating.

More:

“When Slaveowners Got Reparations,” Tera W. Hunter, New York Times

_____________

Short link: https://wp.me/p6sb6-wXD

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

 

Santa Baby

December 21, 2020

“Santa Baby!” written by Joan Javits and Philip Springer. The original 1953 recording by Eartha Kitt, with Henri René and his orchestra.

_____________

Short link: https://wp.me/p6sb6-vPx

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

DC Emancipation Day, 1862: It Was Slaveowners Who Got Reparations.

April 16, 2019

DC Emancipation Day, 1862: It Was Slaveowners Who Got Reparations.

On April 16, 1862, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln signed an act freeing the 3000 enslaved people in the District of Columbia. This was nine months before he signed the Emancipation Proclamation freeing slaves in the Confederate states, many of whom actually remained in bondage until the the war’s end in 1865, and 20 months before ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment, which definitively outlawed slavery everywhere in the United States.

Understandably, April 16th is a holiday in the District of Columbia, District Emancipation Day, celebrated with speeches, concerts, fireworks and parades. There’s a bit of rain on that parade, though, if you take a closer look at history. That 1862 act was called the Compensated Emancipation Act, and it authorized payments to DC slaveowners rather than liberation of enslaved people on moral grounds. It even sought to promote emigration of former slaves outside the borders of the United States.

In any case, black Washingtonians had their freedom. That’s definitely worth celebrating.

More:

“When Slaveowners Got Reparations,” Tera W. Hunter, New York Times

Related:

“Georgetown students vote in favor of reparations for enslaved people,” Susan Svrluga, Washington Post

_____________

Short link: https://wp.me/p6sb6-t4e

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

March 17th

March 17, 2016

March 17th

March 17th marks an American popular and commercial holiday with roots in the liturgical calendar. The first St. Patrick’s Day Parade in New York City (1848) started and ended at memorials to George Washington and allowed Irish Americans to demonstrate both their love of their heritage and allegiance to their new country. They weren’t trusted by many of the native-born because they were, you know, immigrants. Today the holiday presents an equal opportunity for all American adults to dye their tongues green.

(more…)

Santa Baby

December 17, 2015

“Santa Baby!” written by Joan Javits and Philip Springer. The original 1953 recording by Eartha Kitt, with Henri René and his orchestra.

_____________

Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-mBe

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

DC Emancipation Day

April 15, 2015

DC Emancipation Day

On April 16, 1862, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln signed an act which freed the 3000 slaves in the District of Columbia. This was nine months before he signed the Emancipation Proclamation freeing slaves held in the Confederate states, many of whom actually remained in bondage until the the war ended in 1865, and 20 months before ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment, which definitively outlawed slavery everywhere in the United States.

(more…)

Santa Baby

December 24, 2014

“Santa Baby!” written by Joan Javits and Philip Springer. The original 1953 recording by Eartha Kitt, with Henri René and his orchestra.

_____________

Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-ksz

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

Santa Baby!

December 24, 2013

“Santa Baby!” written by Joan Javits and Philip Springer. The original 1953 recording by  Eartha Kitt with Henri René and his orchestra.

_____________

Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-hZz

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

 

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

St. Patrick’s Day

March 17, 2011

St. Patrick's Day

March 17th marks an American popular and commercial holiday with roots in the liturgical calendar. The first St. Patrick’s Day Parade in New York City (1848) started and ended at memorials to George Washington and allowed Irish Americans to demonstrate both their love of their heritage and allegiance to  their new country. For many today the holiday presents an opportunity for adults to dye their tongues green.

 

Sure, an’ all, wee Mr. Potato Head® is a registered trademark of Hasbro, Inc.,  used here under the “satire” provision of the Fair Use doctrine, dontcha know.  Mr. Head is a Yank “Baby Boomer,” but clean the paidrín up and he makes a proper little leprechaun.

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

1492 and all that …

October 8, 2010

1492 and all that ....
On October 11, 2010, the Federal Office of Management and Budget observes the invasion of the Americas by Christophorus Columbus (aka Christoffa Corombo, Cristoforo Colombo, Cristóvão Colombo, Christovam Colom, and Cristóbal Colón), a Genoese private contractor working for the government of Castille. U.S. Federal employees have Monday off. Even at the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Of course, senators and congressmen have every Monday off. Every Friday, too.

God Bless America.

Note: Monday, Oct. 11, 2010 is Native American Day in South Dakota.

 

Image (First Invasion of The Americas, after Dioscoro Teofilo de la Puebla Tolin) by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.