La chanteuse Patachou est morte

May 12, 2015

Henriette Ragon, the French vocalist known as Patachou, died on April 30th at the age of 96. She was a noted singer in the post-war Chanson tradition. Her stage name derived from the name of the Montmartre cafe where she first sang after WWII, Chez Patachou, then owned by her first husband. “Patachou” is a contraction of pâte à choux, cream puff dough.

Above: Mme. Ragon sings Georges Brassens‘ “Brave Margot,” accompanied by Léo Clarens and his Orchestra.

More:

“Patachou, French Singer With a Habit of Snipping Neckties, Dies at 96,” Margalit Fox, New York Times

“La chanteuse Patachou est morte,” Le Figaro

Patachou biographie, RFI Musique

___________
Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-ljm

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

Baltimore

May 11, 2015

“Nobody got in nobody’s way
So I guess you could say
It was a good day
At least a little better than the day in Baltimore”

— Prince

More:

“Prince Is Dropping a Song, Guitar Solo for Baltimore,” Asawin Suebsaeng, Daily Beast

“Prince takes the stage for ‘Rally 4 Peace’ show in Baltimore,” Lacey Johnson, Reuters
___________

Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-ljd

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

Mothers Day, a Horror Story

May 9, 2015

Mothers Day, a Horror Story

This is a tale of love, obsession, madness, candy, and carnations. It is the story of Mother’s Day.

The holiday was passionately promoted by single-minded spinster Anna Jarvis (1864-1948), described by Michael Farquhar as “… a woman of fierce loyalty and tireless enterprise and a total raving lunatic.”

Miss Jarvis worshipped her mother’s memory, and no wonder. Her mother, Ann Maria Reeves Jarvis (1832 – 1905), was truly a saint. Daughter of a clergyman, Ann Maria Reeves married merchant and minister Granville E. Jarvis and gave birth to 11 children, only four of whom survived into adulthood.  In 1851 Mrs. Jarvis, a Sunday School teacher, founded Mothers Day Work Clubs in West Virginia. These met in local churches but were no parish sewing circles.  The clubs dealt with health care, disability, infant mortality, poverty, employment, worker safety, food safety, and sanitation issues. Mrs. Jarvis’ brother, James E. Reeves, MD, a public health authority, was a supporter and frequent club lecturer.

The Civil War divided West Virginia communities and families, but Mrs. Jarvis kept Mothers Day Work Club members together. The women treated wounded soldiers on both sides and helped combat typhoid fever and measles epidemics.  After the war Mrs. Jarvis organized an annual Mothers’ Friendship Day to help reunite neighbors who had supported opposing sides. People honored mothers with carnations. After her husband died in 1902, Mrs Jarvis (and her daughters) moved to Philadelphia and lived with her son Claude, a prosperous businessman.

Ann Maria Reeves Jarvis died on the second Sunday in May 1905, and daughter Anna was bereft. Two years after her mother’s death, on the second Sunday in May, Miss Jarvis invited friends to observe the occasion. In 1907  she telegraphed the minister of the West Virginia church her father had built and promoted a 1908 Mother’s Day service there. She did not attend herself, but donated carnations for mothers in the congregation.

Speaking on “Mothers of the Bible,” Mrs. Ann Maria Jarvis once said: “I hope that someone, sometime will found a memorial mothers day commemorating her for the matchless service she renders to humanity in every field of life.” Miss Jarvis devoted her life to fulfilling her mother’s vision. By 1908 she had enlisted prominent Philadelphia allies including philanthropist John Wanamaker. Many states and cities adopted the holiday; the U.S. Congress designated the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day and President Wilson approved the joint resolution in 1914.

Accomplishing her mother’s dream became a nightmare for Anna Jarvis. For her, the holiday was sacred to the memory of her own mother; now it was profaned by hucksterism, the pursuit of profits by florists, confectioners, restaurateurs, and greeting card manufacturers. “I wanted it to be a day of sentiment, not profit,” she said:

“A printed card means nothing except that you are too lazy to write to the woman who has done more for you than anyone in the world. And candy! You take a box to mother—and then eat most of it yourself. A pretty sentiment! “ Anna Jarvis

It drove her nuts. Literally. She ended her life in a sanitarium.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Well-Tempered Boomwhacker

May 7, 2015

“Prélude n°1 aux tubes musicaux (boomwhackers),” extrait du spectacle “Liaison Carbone,” une création de Denis Paumier (compagnie Les Objets Volants).

Yes, Bach’s Prelude and Fugue No.1 in C major, BWV 846 from Das Wohltemperirte Clavier (1722)

___________
Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-lfL

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

Seis de Mayo

May 6, 2015

Seis de Mayo

Last night, the 5th of May, millions of Americans commemorated the Mexican victory at the Battle of Puebla (1862) with volleys of shots — of tequila — bravura barrages of beer, and murderous margaritas. Unsurprisingly, this morning finds heads held hostage and stomachs seared from nacho napalm. Today’s Spanish vocabulary lesson:  crudo means ” hangover.”

If you celebrated Cinco de Mayo with cerveza, celebrate Seis de Mayo this morning with el desayuno de los campeones, the Breakfast of Champions. The traditional Mexican hangover cure is menudo  tripe soup or stew.

Emergency hangover instructions issued by the Department of Homeland Security suggest a stockpile of canned menudo —Juanita’s,  Pico PicaLa PreferidaLa Costeña, — but if you prefer fresh relief, have an ambulance deliver a few pounds of white honeycomb beef tripe (culin or pancita), posole (white hominy), dried or fresh chili peppers (ancho, poblano), onion, garlic, and maybe a nice calf’s foot (veal knuckle). Sure beats corn flakes.

Read the rest of this entry »

El Cinco de Mayo, un día de fiesta grande en los Estados Unidos

May 5, 2015

El Cinco de Mayo, un día de fiesta grande en los Estados Unidos

Cinco de Mayo, the 5th of May, is the biggest Mexican holiday in the entire United States. Oh sure, the holiday commemorates the 1862 Battle of Puebla, so kids in that Mexican city get the day off to watch a parade, and gringo-infested beach resorts get a little loco, but the rest of Mexico carries on as usual.

North of the border, it’s a different story. The community-based Mexican-American celebrations of the Sixties were co-opted by marketers for big multinational brewers, tequila importers, and mega-food purveyors. In other words, St. Patrick’s Day with mariachis. Is this a great country, or what?

Read the rest of this entry »

The Surveillance Society

May 4, 2015

The Surveillance Society

We live in “the surveillance society,” observes Megan Garber:

 “… surveillance is distributed and small-sized and iterative. It is a logical extension of the hot-mic moment, of the caught-on-tape trope, of the blooper reel—and also, in its way, of the role cameras have recently played in exposing crime and police brutality.”

“… technology is making it harder to differentiate between the people we perform and the people we are.”

— “Britt McHenry and the Upsides of a Surveillance Society,” Megan Garber, The Atlantic

_________

Short linkhttp://wp.me/p6sb6-gN1

Top image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

American Airlines iPad Crash

May 3, 2015

American Airlines iPad Crash

70 American Airlines flights were delayed last week when an app on the pilots’ iPads crashed. The problem wasn’t with the planes or the iPads but with the software, made by a division of Boeing. According to Re/Code a conflict between two versions of the Washington National Airport map jammed up the software, and the glitch was finally solved by deleting and re-installing the app.

American Airlines has been using Apple tablets in all its planes since 2013, replacing the 35 pounds of reference papers and manuals each pilot used to haul on board for each flight. The airline says going paperless and replacing 24 million pages of documents with 8,000 iPads saves the company 400,000 gallons of fuel each year.

Read the rest of this entry »

Ben E. King, 1938 — 2015

May 1, 2015

Ben E. King, 1938 -- 2015

Soulful vocalist Ben E. King (Ben Nelson) died Thursday at age 76. He sang with the Five Crowns and the Drifters before recording the solo hit records “Spanish Harlem” (1960) and “Stand By Me” (1961).

Read the rest of this entry »

Pope Francis Says the Gender Wage Gap is a Scandal

April 30, 2015

Pope Francis Says the Gender Wage Gap Is a Scandal
“The Christian seed of radical equality between men and women must bring new fruits,” Pope Francis said on Wednesday. “We should support with decisiveness the right to equal pay for equal work. Why should it be taken for granted that women must earn less than men? The disparity is pure scandal.”

Read the rest of this entry »


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 146 other followers