Posts Tagged ‘WWII’

The US Photographed Its Own WWII Concentration Camps

March 31, 2022

President Franklin D. Roosevelt passed Executive Order 9066 in February 1942, two months after Japan bombied Pearl Harbor. It empowered the US army to incarcerate 120,000 Japanese Americans in concentration camps during World War II.

In March 1942 the government created a new department, the War Relocation Authority, and hired photographers to document “resettlement” and life in the “relocation” camps, possibly to complement the work of the WRA’s Community Analysis Section. One of those photographers was Dorothea Lange, who had documented dustbowl migrants and other rural Americans for the Farm Security Administration. The WRA photographs were surpressed until 1972.

A Vox video by Coleman Lowndes.

More:

Dorothea Lange’s WRA photos at the University of California

Dorothea Lange’s WRA photos at the US National Archives

The Densho Encyclopedia

Japanese American incarceration

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Meatless Tuesday

March 26, 2022

“Meatless Tuesday,” a 1943 Walter Lanz “Cartune” featuring Andy Panda and Charlie Chicken. Directed by James Culhane. Note: “Meatless Mondays” were a wartime feature of WI and WWII.

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Canine Commandos

March 19, 2022

“Canine Commandos,” a 1943 Walter Lanz “Cartune” featuring Andy Panda. Directed by Alex Lovy.

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Air Raid Warden

March 12, 2022

“Air Raid Warden,” a 1942 Walter Lanz “Cartune” featuring Andy Panda. doing his bit on the Home Front. Directed by Alex Lovy.

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December 7th

December 7, 2021

“The reason Japan attacked Pearl Harbor,” a short video by the UK Imperial War Museums.

More:

“Blood and Oil: Why Japan Atracked Pearl Harbor,” Daniel Yergin, Washington Post

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Vera Lynn, 1917 – 2020

June 19, 2020

Dame Vera Lynn died yesterday at the age of 103. The singer, actress, and radio personality is best known for her 1939 recording of “We’ll Meet Again,” written by Ross Parker and Hughie Charles, a signature song of Britain in World War II. Not a bad anthem for the pandemic crisis quarantine, either.

More:

“Vera Lynn, Singer Whose Wartime Ballads Lifted Britain, Dies at 103,” Lawrence Van Gelder, New York Times

“Obituary: Dame Vera Lynn, a symbol of resilience and hope,” BBC News

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Umbriago

May 30, 2020

“Umbriago,” written by Irving Caesar and Jimmy Durante, performed by Mr. Durante in a clip from the 1944 movie Music for Millions. Umbriago is apparently a happy-go-lucky character in Italian folklore.

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Praise The Lord and Pass The Ammunition

September 1, 2019

“Praise The Lord and Pass The Ammunition,” written by Frank Loesser in 1942, recorded by Kay Kyser and his Orchestra with Glee Club in 1943. 

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Operation Dragoon

August 29, 2019

Operation Dragoon was the Allied invasion of occupied Southern France during World War II. Troops from France’s African and Carribean colonial garrisons took part, and thousands of them died. Their contrubution has been largely ignored, until now.

More:

“France commemorates its ‘forgotten’ African veterans,” Christina Okello, RFI

“African leaders join Macron at commemoration of WWII landings in Provence,” France 24

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D-Day’s ‘Matchbox Fleet’

June 6, 2019

D-Day’s ‘Matchbox Fleet’

Sixty wood-hulled boats made in Brooklyn were carried across the North Atlantic to England on the decks of Liberty Ships seventy years ago. The patrol boats, each 83 feet long, were designed for anti-submarine patrol and coastal search and escort, but had been modified as rescue craft. Most had radar; some had sonar.

The group of small, wooden, gasoline-powered cutters, vulnerable to incendiary shells, was understandably nicknamed the ”Matchbox Fleet.”  On June 6, 1944, these boats crossed the English Channel as U.S. Coast Guard Rescue Flotilla One (ResFlo1), part of Operation Neptune/Overlord.

Inscription on the Rescue Flotilla 1 (The “Matchbox Fleet”) Memorial, harborside at Poole, Dorset, UK:

“From this Quay, 60 cutters of the United States Coast Guard Rescue Flotilla 1 departed for the Normandy Invasion, 6 June 1944.  These 83 foot boats, built entirely of wood, and the 840 crewmembers were credited with saving the lives of 1437 men and 1 woman.  In remembrance of the service of Rescue Flotilla 1, and with appreciation of the kindnesses of the people of Poole to the crews, this Plaque is given by the men and women of the United States Coast Guard.”

Above: 83-footer off the Normandy coast on June 8, 1944.

More:

U.S. Coast Guard Rescue Flotilla One at Normandy

The Iron Sailors of the Last Wooden Patrol Boat (WPB)

The Cutters,” E. Bishop, Naval History May/June 1994 (PDF courtesy of uscg83footers.org)

Rescue Flotilla 1WW2Talk (good selection of photos)

The U. S. Coast Guard at Normandy, Scott T. Price (overview of D-Day operations by USCG)

“How Rescue Flotilla One saved more than 400 men on D-Day,” The History Guy (video)

 

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Top image adapted from a Wheeler Shipyard graphic by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

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