Posts Tagged ‘web’

Turkey Blocks Access to Wikipedia

May 1, 2017

Turkey Blocks Access to Wikipedia

“Turkish residents were unable to access Wikipedia on Saturday after the government blocked the site, citing content ‘showing Turkey in coordination and aligned with various terrorist groups,’ according to the Anadolu news agency.

The government has not officially commented on the outage. But the Transport, Maritime Affairs and Communications Ministry told the state-run agency, ‘Instead of coordinating against terrorism, (Wikipedia) has become part of an information source which is running a smear campaign against Turkey in the international arena.'”

— “Turkey Blocks Wikipedia, Accusing It Of Running ‘Smear Campaign,'” Amy Held, NPR

More:

“Turkey just banned Wikipedia, labeling it a ‘national security threat,’” Amanda Erickson, Washington Post

“Turkey blocks Wikipedia under law designed to protect national security,”Reuters, via The Guardian

“2017 block of Wikipedia in Turkey,” Wikipedia

___________________

Short Link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-pLo

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

Pepper Spray University Gets Schooled About PR

April 18, 2016

Pepper Spray University Gets Schooled About PR

In November 2011 the worldwide Occupy Movement reached the campus of the University of California at Davis. Protesters staging a sit-down strike were pepper-sprayed by UC Davis campus police in riot gear. It wasn’t a pretty picture, and outrage spread across the country and the Web. Now the Sacramento Bee has discovered that the UC Davis administration spent at least $175,000 trying to scrub bad publicity about the ugly incident from the Internet and repair the school’s reputation.

Understandably, news of the cover-up attempt has sparked fresh outrage, new campus demonstrations, and calls for the Chancellor’s resignation. And, despite the scrubbing effort, the 2011 UC Davis pepper spray incident is now a Google trending topic.

More:

“UC Davis gets caught in a PR coverup,” San Francisco Chronicle editorial

(more…)

What Should I Read Next?

March 24, 2013

What Should I Read Next?

What Should I Read Next? (WSIRN), “the easiest to use book recommendation system online,” was developed and is maintained by Andrew Chapman and Paul Lenz of Thoughtplay Ltd., and employs “a collaborative filtering system, using our own bespoke algorithm called ‘Incidence Bias Weighting’ and partly using association rules.” This labor of love has been up and running since 2005.

While Amazon recommends titles based on past buying behavior, Chapman and Lenz don’t, observing “you don’t always buy items for yourself, do you?” WSIRN links to Amazon so you can, though. “We’re not trying to urge you to buy particular bestsellers or anything like that,” they say, “we simply want to help people share their favorite items with each other.”

________________

Short Link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-gkg

Image (“The Kindle Reader or A Young Girl Seated, after Renoir”) by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

Britannica Bytes

March 19, 2012

Britannica Bytes
After 244 years, Encyclopaedia Britannica will cease publishing paper editions and become a solely digital resource. Britannica has had digital editions on CD-ROM and online for the last thirty years, and will continue updating and publishing online. Unlike Wikipedia with its anonymous authors and crowd-sourced editing, digital Britannica will still be produced by professional editors and named authors who actually know what they’re writing about.

More:

“Wikipedia Didn’t Kill Britannica. Windows Did,” Tim Carmody, Wired

“Change: It’s Okay. Really.” Britannica Editors, Britannica blog

___________________

Short Link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-cMm

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

The Digital Political Divide

January 2, 2012

The Digital Political Divide

“Research has confirmed that the Internet exerts a polarizing force on the electorate. In his 2011 book The Filter Bubble, Eli Pariser writes about how search engines and social networks filter out dissenting opinions and offer users only what they want to see. Google and Yahoo draw on a user’s past search preferences when responding to queries, meaning that over time a liberal and a conservative might receive ideologically opposite search results having entered identical information. (Pariser recounts how a conservative entering the letters “BP” into Google received stock tips, whereas a liberal was linked to news stories on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.)

 Similar work by Cass Sunstein, the current Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, shows how the Internet creates “echo chambers” where users surround themselves only with the like-minded. This not only preserves partisanship—it exacerbates it. Sunstein found that pro-choice liberals become more pro-choice if they interact only with other liberals, and anti-abortion conservatives become more anti-abortion after surrounding themselves with other conservatives. The niche driven nature of the Internet is pushing us further and further apart.”

“Is the Internet Polarizing Politics?” Peter James Saalfield, big think

___________________

Short Link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-c4Z

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Halloween on the Web

October 30, 2011

Halloween on the Web

Tricks and treats from across the Interwebz:

“Zombies Never Die,” “Emily Sohn, Discovery News

“Halloween 2011: Top Costumes, History, Myths, More,” Brian Handwerk, National Geographic News

“Foreclosure Mill’s Halloween Party Mocks Homeless, Displaced,” Daniel Frankel, The Wrap

“Anti-Wall Streeters inspire Halloween costumes,” Leanne Italie, Associated Press via Google

“The ‘War on Halloween’: A Trick or a Treat for Conservatives?” Leslie Savanon, The Nation

(more…)

Lady Liberty Goes High-Tech

October 28, 2011

Lady Liberty Goes High-Tech

The Statue of Liberty got some high-tech gifts for her 125th birthday. Webcams have been installed in her torch so the masses can huddle over their laptops and enjoy the view. Yearning to see free?  Click here.

(more…)

China Googles, Finds Capitalism

October 7, 2011

China Googles, Finds Capitalism

The Google search engine has been available in China since 2006, but the firm complied with government censorship restrictions (‘The Great Firewall of China“) until 2010. Disclosure of this fact resulted in Congressional hearings and a Google redirect from China to its Hong Kong site. The conflict was uneasily resolved later after the government realized that 70% of the country’s Web surfers use China’s homegrown search engine, Baidu.

Google China recently had its license renewed, dodging further censorship conflict by building a Chinese version of the DoubleClick advertising delivery platform as its core in-country business.

Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-bcY

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

Earthquake Today. Next: Hurricane.

August 23, 2011

Phil Plait’s animation (above) shows how the shock of today’s earthquake rippled across the country.  The seismic wave also rolled across the Blogosphere and Twitterverse:

(more…)

The Web is Ancient

August 9, 2011

The Web is Ancient

The World Wide Web is 20 years old this week. That’s two millennia in computer years.

On August 6, 1991 Sir Tim Berners-Lee unleashed the first public World Wide Web server. It was a NeXT cube on his desk at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. He had actually designed the Web in 1989 but published the first website two years later.

CERN went on to produce the Large Hadron Collider . The Web produces LOL Cats.

Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-aP7

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine