Posts Tagged ‘Veterans Day’

Trump Fires Pentagon Brass, Commemorates Veterans Day

November 11, 2020
Trump Fires Pentagon Brass, Commemorates Veterans Day

High School Cadet Capt. Trump. Thank you for your service.

On Wednesday it was raining too hard to play golf, so President Donald Trump commemorated Veterans Day by visiting Arlington National Cemetery and silently laying a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Mr. Trump had prepared for the event on Monday by firing West Point graduate Mark Esper, his more-or-less 5th Secretary of Defense. Mr. Esper, a veteran of the Army’s 101st Airborne Division, was awarded the Bronze Star for his service in Iraq. You may recall that Mr. Trump has a service-related disability: he was gravely wounded as soon as he became eligible for the Vietnam draft lottery, and was treated (on paper) at a Queens NY storefront a podiatrist rented from Fred Trump, his dad.

Armed Forces Fact: The Pentagon is in Arlington, Virginia, only 2 miles from Arlington National Cemetery.

More:

“Trump Fires Mark Esper, Defense Secretary Who Opposed Use of Troops on U.S. Streets,”Helene Cooper, Eric Schmitt and Maggie Haberman,  New York Times

“Pentagon sees flurry of resignations after Trump ousts secretary,” Ellen Mitchell, The Hill

“‘Devastating’: Top Pentagon leadership gutted as fears rise over national security,” Lara Seligman and Daniel Lippman, Politico

“Worries grow about rudderless post-election Pentagon,” Ellen Mitchell, The Hill

“Trump administration upends senior Pentagon ranks, installing loyalists,” Dan Lamothe, Missy Ryan, Josh Dawsey and Paul Sonne, Washington Post

“Trump loyalists elevated to powerful roles at the Pentagon after firing of Defense Secretary Esper,” Amanda Macias. CNBC

“Trump Stacks the Pentagon and Intel Agencies With Loyalists. To What End?” David E. Sanger and Eric Schmitt, New York Times

“Republicans muzzle anger over Trump’s Pentagon culling, afraid antagonizing him could imperil Georgia runoff,” Karoun Demirjian, Washington Post

Updates:

“Military wary that shakeup could upend its apolitical nature,” Lolitia C. Baldor, Associated Press

“Why Trump is suddenly replacing Pentagon officials with loyalists,” Alex Ward, Vox

Related:

“Gen. Milley’s nurse wife gave CPR to bystander who collapsed at ceremony,” Marina Pitofsky, The Hill

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Top image: Cadet Capt. Trump’s high school picture. Download a copy here.

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Armistice Day

November 11, 2020

Armistice Day

Today Veterans Day is observed in the United States. It was originally named Armistice Day and commemorated the time the agreement to stop The Great War was signed, at the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. After World War I failed to be The War to End All Wars, the U.S. observance was officially renamed Veterans Day in 1954, probably because veterans of later wars vote and dead WWI soldiers don’t, and we already have Memorial Day. Britain still commemorates the WWI Armistice and those who died to achieve it, and today it is known as Remembrance Day in Commonwealth nations.

More:

“History of Veterans Day,” U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

“A day by many names, celebrated all the same,” Jason Duhr, Stars and Stripes

(more…)

Armistice Day

November 11, 2019

Armistice Day

Today Veterans Day is observed in the United States. It was originally named Armistice Day and commemorated the time the agreement to stop The Great War was signed, at the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. After World War I failed to be The War to End All Wars, the U.S. observance was officially renamed Veterans Day in 1954, probably because veterans of later wars vote and dead WWI soldiers don’t, and we already have Memorial Day. Britain still commemorates the WWI Armistice and those who died to achieve it, and today it is known as Remembrance Day in Commonwealth nations.

More:

“History of Veterans Day,” U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

“Armistice Day 100 Years Since the end of WWI,” Stephanie Hall, Folklife Today

“A day by many names, celebrated all the same,” Jason Duhr, Stars and Stripes

(more…)

Armistice Day

November 12, 2018

Armistice Day

This is when Veterans Day is observed in the United States. It was originally named Armistice Day and commemorated the time the agreement to stop The Great War was signed, at the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. After World War I failed to be The War to End All Wars, the U.S. observance was officially renamed Veterans Day in 1954, probably because veterans of later wars vote and dead WWI soldiers don’t, and we already have Memorial Day. Britain still commemorates the WWI Armistice and those who died to achieve it, and today it is known as Remembrance Day in Commonwealth nations.

More:

“History of Veterans Day,” U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

“Armistice Day 100 Years Since the end of WWI,” Stephanie Hall, Folklife Today

“A day by many names, celebrated all the same,” Jason Duhr, Stars and Stripes

“Why Veterans Day is often confused with Memorial Day,” Valerie Strauss, Washington Post

“Veterans Day is a prayer for peace,” Joe Sacco and Adam Hochschild, Tom Dispatch via Salon

“Why doesn’t the US observe Armistice Day? We’re more comfortable with war than peace,” Rory Fannin, The Guardian

“Veterans Day should actually be about serving veterans,” Libby Nelson, Vox

“Honor Veterans By Considering Revival of National Service,” Ed Kilgore, Washington Monthly blog

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Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-mrs

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Armistice Day

November 11, 2016

Armistice Day

This is Veterans Day in the United States. It was originally named Armistice Day and commemorated the time the agreement to stop The Great War was signed, at the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. After World War I failed to be The War to End All Wars, the U.S. observance was officially renamed Veterans Day in 1954, probably because veterans vote and dead WWI soldiers don’t, and we already have Memorial Day. Britain still commemorates the WWI Armistice and those who died to achieve it, and today is known as Remembrance Day in Commonwealth nations.

More:

“History of Veterans Day,” U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

“A day by many names, celebrated all the same,” Jason Duhr, Stars and Stripes

“Why Veterans Day is often confused with Memorial Day,” Valerie Strauss, Washington Post

“Veterans Day is a prayer for peace,” Joe Sacco and Adam Hochschild, Tom Dispatch via Salon

“Why doesn’t the US observe Armistice Day? We’re more comfortable with war than peace,” Rory Fannin, The Guardian

“Veterans Day should actually be about serving veterans,” Libby Nelson, Vox

“Honor Veterans By Considering Revival of National Service,” Ed Kilgore, Washington Monthly blog

“Recent Veterans Still Struggle To Find Work,” Ben Casselman,FiveThirtyEight

“Why do so many female veterans struggle to find work?” Kelly Wallace, CNN

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Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-mrs

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Armistice Day

November 11, 2015

Armistice Day

This is Veterans Day in the United States. It was originally named Armistice Day and commemorated the time the agreement to stop The Great War was signed, at the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. After World War I failed to be The War to End All Wars, the U.S. observance was officially renamed Veterans Day in 1954, probably because veterans vote and dead WWI soldiers don’t (except in Chicago), and we already have Memorial Day. Britain still commemorate the WWI Armistice and those who died to achieve it, and today is known as Remembrance Day in Commonwealth nations.

More:

“History of Veterans Day,” U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

“A day by many names, celebrated all the same,” Jason Duhr, Stars and Stripes

(more…)

Armistice Day

November 11, 2014

Armistice Day
This is Veterans Day in the United States. It was originally named Armistice Day and commemorated the time the agreement to stop The Great War was signed, at the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. After World War I failed to be The War to End All Wars, the U.S. observance was officially renamed Veterans Day in 1954, probably because veterans vote and dead WWI soldiers don’t (except in Chicago), and we already have Memorial Day. Britain still commemorate the WWI Armistice and those who died to achieve it, and today is known as Remembrance Day in Commonwealth nations.

(more…)

Armistice Day

November 11, 2013

Armistice Day

This is Veterans Day in the United States. It was originally named Armistice Day and commemorated the time the guns stopped in The Great War, at the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. After that failed to be The War to End All Wars, the observance was officially renamed Veterans Day in 1954.

More:

“History of Veterans Day,” U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

“A day by many names, celebrated all the same,” Jason Duhr, Stars and Stripes

“Veterans Day is a prayer for peace,” Joe Sacco and Adam Hochschild, Tom Dispatch via Salon

Related:

“Welcoming returning soldiers home — and in off the streets,” Mary Cunningham and Jennifer Biess, Metro Trends

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Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-hOg

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Closet Veterans

November 11, 2010

Closet Veterans 

The Washington Post is observing Veterans Day with a story previewing the Pentagon report on the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy:

“More than 70 percent of respondents to a survey sent to active-duty and reserve troops over the summer said the effect of repealing the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy would be positive, mixed or nonexistent, said two sources familiar with the document. The survey results led the report’s authors to conclude that objections to openly gay colleagues would drop once troops were able to live and serve alongside them.”

— “Sources: Pentagon group finds there is minimal risk to lifting gay ban during war,” Ed O’Keefe and Greg Jaffe, Washington Post.

The chief authors of the study are Pentagon General Counsel Jeh Johnson and the Commander of U.S. Forces in Europe, General Carter Ham.

 

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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Veteran’s Day 2009

November 11, 2009

Veteran's Day 2009

This is Veterans Day in the United States. It was once called Armistice Day, marking the time the guns stopped in The Great War, at the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. When that failed to be The War to End All Wars, the observance was renamed Veterans Day in 1954.

This year the holiday is marked by the launch of a new web site for vets, Today’s G.I. Bill, a guide to education benefits for post-9/11 veterans that is more user-friendly than the Department of Veterans Affairs or active-duty military sites. The project is supported by the Lumina Foundation and the American Council on Education.

While implementation of the education benefit is not without problems, it has been more successful than other vet programs. 131,000 U.S. veterans will be homeless tonight. 5.5 million vets are living with a disability. Up to 35% of Iraq veterans experience Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). You can help. Look here to find out how.

 

Hat tip: Inside Higher Ed

Hear and read the stories of veterans in their own words at the website of Veterans History Project of the American Folklife Center.

Image: Lumina Foundation.

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.