Posts Tagged ‘Thanksgiving’

Thankful

November 23, 2017

“Thankful,” written by Drew Ramsey, Shannon Sanders, and Jonny Lang, recorded by Mr. Lang with Michael McDonald.

Jonny Lang website

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Short link: https://wp.me/p6sb6-qJY

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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Thanksgiving Greetings from William S. Burroughs

November 23, 2017

Thanksgiving Greetings from William S. Burroughs
A holiday poem from Williams S. Burroughs: “Thanks for the wild turkey and the passenger pigeons …”
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Thankful

November 24, 2016

“Thankful,” written by Drew Ramsey, Shannon Sanders, and Jonny Lang, recorded by Mr. Lang with Michael McDonald.

Jonny Lang website

________________________

Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-oXd

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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I Thank You

November 24, 2016

“I Thank You,” written by David Porter and Isaac Hayes, performed by ZZ Top. It was originally recorded by Sam & Dave in 1968. A must for any Thanksgiving playlist.

ZZ Top website

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Short link:  http://wp.me/p6sb6-oXb

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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Thanksgiving Greetings from William S. Burroughs

November 24, 2016

Thanksgiving Greetings from William S. Burroughs
A holiday poem from Williams S. Burroughs: “Thanks for the wild turkey and the passenger pigeons …”

(more…)

Turkey Carving Tips for Real Guys

November 24, 2016

Turkey Carving Tips for Real Guys

Oh no! Despite reading Turkey Torching Tips for Real Guys you have a great big, fully cooked, deep-fried Thanksgiving turkey on your hands. You examine it minutely and discover there’s no little red zip tab to open so you can take out slices. What now?

That’s some big old avian cadaver you got there, buddy. There’s only one manly way to divvy it up. That’s right: chainsaw.

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Turkey Torching Tips for Real Guys

November 23, 2016

Turkey Torching Tips for Real Guys

The National Fire Protection Association claims “turkey fryers that use oil, as currently designed, are not suitable for acceptably safe use by even a well-informed and careful consumer.” Wimps! Thursday is Thanksgiving, when we give thanks for college football and a four-day weekend. That’s when Real American Men generate Code Orange air quality by incinerating poultry on the patio. Yeah, buddy!

Any pantywaist can cook on those SUV-sized natural gas, propane, electric, or gelignite-powered barbecue grills with all those fancy features (good subwoofers can help spread sauce evenly, though). Nah, let’s get ready to deep-fry us some turkey. Here’s how:

1. Put Fire Department on Speed-Dial. Keep your cell phone in your welding apron pocket. It is unwise to enter a flaming residence to use the telephone.

2. Purchase more equipment. You can never have enough Real Guy outdoor cooking gear. Buy some new stuff at Home Depot first. Forget about those electronic gizmos from Leading Edge, you can never read their LCD screens outdoors anyway. Williams-Sonoma? Isn’t that the California wine the wife likes?

3. Don’t forget the turkey. It should be big enough to bother messing with. Double-check to make sure you are not buying a goat or lamb.

4. Check interior compartment of poultry (note: light does not go on automatically; use your Maglite). Any paper-wrapped parcels inside will not contain Surprise Creme Filling. Remove; give to wife or cat. If the bird is frozen, use your Benz-0-Matic torch judiciously or the meat will be dry. At this point you may marinate the turkey in any fluid mixture as long as it contains beer.

5. Equipment check list. This will vary but should definitely include safety equipment (welding apron, Kevlar™ gloves, safety glasses, fire extinguisher, cell phone, well-stocked beer cooler or full beer keg with ice), fire ignition tools (lighting chimney, matches, butane torch,  highway flares, flamethrower, etc.), food manipulating tools (tongs, skewers, forks, knives, pneumatic jack), cooking implements (meat thermometer, meat hygrometer, count-down timer, 55-gallon deep-fry container, perforated deep-fry container insert with turkey stand and handle, caulking gun for stuffing insertion, brushes, sprayguns, and hypodermic needles for applying sauce, tattoo gun for decorations, crane), deep-fry medium (vegetable oil is better than animal fat; Marvel Mystery Oil is not recommended), sauces, rubs, marinades, condiments, spices, and essential vegetables (potato salad, cole slaw, ketchup). Anything missing? See Step #2. Got everything? Cheers! Begin beer consumption.

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Pizza, a Thanksgiving Tradition

November 22, 2016

Pizza, a Thanksgiving Tradition

Fun Food Fact: The day before Thanksgiving is one of the busiest days for take-out pizza, right up there with Super Bowl Sunday.

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Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-oUV

Image (“First Fun Thanksgiving, after J.L.G. Ferris [detail]“) by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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The Mother of Thanksgiving

November 26, 2015

The Mother of Thanksgiving

America’s Thanksgiving national holiday doesn’t go directly back to Plymouth Rock. It’s due to the persistence of Sarah Josepha Hale (1788 – 1879). Mrs. Hale was a poet, a novelist, and the influential editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book magazine. She was a New Englander by birth, and thought everyone in the USA should celebrate that region’s Pilgrim founders the way they did it in Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

Sarah Josepha Hale also wrote cookbooks, and described a New England Thanksgiving meal in her novel Northwood. The menu includes roast turkey, sirloin of beef, leg of pork, loin of mutton, bowls of gravy, plates of vegetables, a goose, a pair of ducklings, chicken pie, plates of pickles, preserves and butter, wheat bread, plum pudding, custards, pumpkin pie, rich cake, sweetmeats and fruits, currant wine, cider and ginger beer.

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Thanksgiving Greetings from William S. Burroughs

November 26, 2015

Thanksgiving Greetings from William S. Burroughs

A holiday poem from Williams S. Burroughs: “Thanks for the wild turkey and the passenger pigeons …”

(more…)