Posts Tagged ‘quack medicine’

7 Doctors at Florida Anti-Vax Summit Get COVID

November 24, 2021

7 Doctors at Florida Anti-Vax Summit Get COVID

Days after anti-vax doctors met in Florida, seven of them came down with COVID-19. The fringe medicos met on November 6th at Ocala’s World Equestrian Center, so naturally they pushed ivermectin horse de-wormer as a coronavirus cure. As the Daily Beast points out, the Equestrian Center requires all participating ponies to be vaccinated against Equine Herpes Virus and Equine Influenza. Florida law prevents vaccine mandates for two-legged participants.

“Florida Summit on Covid” participants listened to the 9 panel “experts” and lunched together, and $250 VIP admission tickets included a private reception and photo opportunity, a likely virus incubator.

More:

“Seven doctors contract Covid after attending Florida anti-vaccine summit,” Maya Yang, The Guardian

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Ron DeSantis Ramps Up Pro-COVID Health Policy

September 27, 2021

Ron DeSantis Ramps Up Pro-COVID Health Policy

Florida Republican governor Ron DeSantis’s pro-life beliefs don’t extend to his constiuients. He’s killed off 50,000 of them so far, forbidding the vaccine mandates and mask requirements that would keep them from dying of COVID-19.

Hospitals in the state are overwhelmed and 300+ people are dying each day, but the governor’s declaring victory, since even greater numbers were sick and dying a few weeks ago. 44% of Floridians still surviving are not fully vaccinated, so any lull in cases will be brief.

To ensure his citizen-reduction policy continues unabated, Mr. DeSantis has appointed a new State Surgeon General, Dr. Joseph Ladapo, who opposes vaccine madates, calls the COVID-19 vaccine “nothing special,” and has promoted the crank COVID “cures” hydroxychloroquine and Ivermectin. He is also associated with “demon sperm” doctor Stella Immanuel.

Dr. Ladapo, who has no public health administrative experience, will also lead the Florida Department of Health. He’s being paid $250,000 a year, 72 percent more than his predecessor.

More:

“Florida’s new surgeon general skeptical of vaccines, opposes masks,” Ruth mole, Ars Technica

“DeSantis places a ‘COVID crank’ in charge of its response,” Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times 

“Florida’s new surgeon general, Dr. Joseph Ladapo, has ties to fringe group pushing bogus COVID cures,” Brett Bachman and Trish Rooney, Salon

“How a doctor who questioned vaccine safety became DeSantis’ surgeon general pick,” Arek Sarkissian, Politico

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Top image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Homeopathic Snake Oil Fuels the Measles Crisis

June 25, 2019

Homeopathic Snake Oil Fuels the Measles Crisis

Kate Birch, a homeopath based in Minnesota, is a leading quack in the lunatic anti-vaxxer campaign behind the raging measles epidemic plaguing America’s children. Homeopathic products are essentially small vials of very expensive water or alcohol masquerading as preventatives and cures for diseases and ailments. Substances they contain are so diluted that the products are essentially placebos.

Why, you may ask, doesn’t the FDA regulate this kind of bunkum? An original Senate sponsor of the 1938 “Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” was a dean at a Homeopathic Medical College, and made sure the act identified all homeopathic swill as drugs. Existing FDA regs are, appropriately, watered-down. Since umpteen-hundred scientific studies show that homeopathic medicine doesn’t work, even the woo-woo department of NIH, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, points out that homeopathy is bunk.

More:

“US homeopaths claim ‘therapies’ prevent measles and ‘cure’ autism,” Ed Pilkington, The Guardian

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FTC Cracks Down on Vintage Quackery

January 17, 2017

FTC Cracks Down on Vintage Quackery
The Federal Trade Commission will now require homeopathic “drugs” to bear labels admitting they are pseudo-scientific frauds. The products, essentially small vials of very expensive water or alcohol, are found in the “attention suckers!” aisles of health food stores, Whole Foods Markets, and CVS stores (which should know better). Substances they contain are so diluted that the products are essentially placebos.

Why, you may ask, doesn’t the FDA regulate this kind of bunkum? An original Senate sponsor of the “Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” was a dean at a Homeopathic Medical College, and made sure the act identified all homeopathic swill as drugs. Existing FDA regs are, appropriately, watered-down. Since umpteen-hundred scientific studies show that homeopathic medicine doesn’t work, even the woo-woo department of NIH, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, points out that homeopathy is bunk.

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God, Guns, Grits and Snake Oil

March 22, 2015

God, Guns, Grits and Snake Oil

Now that Mike Huckabee has left Fox News, he’s financing his presidential campaign in an unconventional way.  He sent out an email pitch for a dubious diabetes cure based on ingredients found in cinnamon buns.

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Dr. Oz and The Baloney Diet

October 21, 2014

Dr. Oz and the Baloney Diet

Produced by Joss Fong, Joe Posner, Alex Hawley; narrated by Julia Belluz.

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Better Health Care Through Astrology

July 26, 2014

Better Health Care Through Astrology

“A Conservative MP has spoken of his belief in astrology and his desire to incorporate it into medicine.

David Tredinnick said he had spent 20 years studying astrology and healthcare and was convinced it could work.

The MP for Bosworth, a member of the health committee and the science and technology committee, said he was not afraid of ridicule or abuse.

‘There is no logic in attacking something that has a proven track record,’ he told BBC News.

He said he had studied the Indian astrological system Iahiri and the way it was used by that country’s government and recalled how Chris Patten, Britain’s last governor of Hong Kong, had an official astrologer, whom Mr Tredinnick had consulted while on a parliamentary delegation there.”

— “Astrology-loving MP seeks health answers in the stars,” BBC News

More:

“Astrology-loving MP David Tredinnick ‘convinced’ practise can reduce strain on NHS,” Kashmira Gander, The Independent

“Combining astrology and healthcare: your medical horoscopes,” Dean Burnett, The Guardian

“Tory MP says astrology is good for the health,”  Laura Donnelly, The Telegraph

 Related:

“Tory MP David Tredinnick claimed £755 for astrology software,” Polly Curtis, The Guardian

Medical astrology,” from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Dr. Oz: Miracle Snake Oil Diet!

June 24, 2014

Dr. Oz: Miracle Snake Oil Diet!

Reality TV star Mehmet Öz, MD testified before a Senate committee last week about fraudulent weight loss scams. He knows all about it; he’s been promoting the likes of green coffee bean extractGarcinia Cambogia, forskolin, and gluten-free everything for years, when he’s not endorsing faith healing and homeopathy.

Has he no shame? Nope.

More:

“Senators to Dr. Oz: Stop Promising Weight-Loss Miracles,” James Hamblin, The Atlantic

“Dr. Oz, still shilling as fast as he can,” Michael Hilzik, Los Angeles Times

“Celebrity turns a good doctor into a snake oil pitchman,” Dr. Manny Alvarez, Fox News

“Dr. Oz Defends His ‘Miracles,'” National Journal

“Dr. Oz Defends His Pseudoscientific Claims As Harmless ‘Flowery Language,'” Francie Diep, Popular Science

“Dr. Oz: World’s Best Snake Oil Salesman,” Russell Saunders, Daily Beast

“It’s Time to Turn Off TV Doctors,” April Siese, Daily Beast

“The Operator,” Michael Spector, The New Yorker

“Why Dr. Oz can say anything and keep his medical license,” Julia Belluz, Vox

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Endowed Chair in Quackery @ University of Aberdeen

May 8, 2012

Endowed Chair in Quackery @ University of Aberdeen
“The University of Aberdeen is considering establishing a chair in a form of alternative medicine described by one expert as ‘pure quackery.’

 Aberdeen’s governance and nominations committee is considering whether to establish a chair in ‘integrative health care and management,’ to be funded primarily by an anthroposophical clinic.

 According to Edzard Ernst, professor of complementary medicine at the University of Exeter, anthroposophy was founded in the early 20th century by Austrian spiritualist Rudolf Steiner. Ernst said that anthroposophical drug treatments were based on the movement’s beliefs about the interplay between physiological and spiritual processes in illness and healing. One example is the use of mistletoe to treat cancer, which is based on the observation that, like cancer, mistletoe is a parasitic growth that eventually kills its host.

Describing anthroposophical medicine as ‘pure quackery,’ Ernst said there was no robust evidence for its effectiveness, with some reports suggesting that mistletoe treatment offered ‘considerable potential for harm.'”

— “‘Holistic’ Research or ‘Quackery’?” Paul Jump, Times Higher Education via Inside Higher Ed

Think it can’t happen here? It has.

“Anthroposophic medicine at the University of Michigan? Say it ain’t so!” Respectful Insolence

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Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

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