Posts Tagged ‘poetry’

Philip Levine, 1928 — 2015

February 23, 2015

Philip Levine, then U.S. Poet Laureate, reading “What Work Is” at the AFL-CIO on Nov. 15, 2011.

“Philip Levine, a Poet of Grit, Sweat and Labor, Dies at 87,” Margalit Fox, New York Times

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Thanksgiving Greetings from William S. Burroughs

November 27, 2014

Thanksgiving Greetings from William S. Burroughs

A holiday poem from Williams S. Burroughs: “Thanks for the wild turkey and the passenger pigeons …”

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Silent Night Before Christmas

December 24, 2013

Shaylee McFeely signs “The Night Before Christmas.”  Sheena McFeely, her mom, introduces her and the rest is captioned. This is the best version of the classic poem you’ll see tonight [4 minutes 51 seconds].

More:

“9 Reasons This Little Girl’s Sign Language Version of  ‘Twas he Night Before Christmas’ is Great,” Arika Okrent, Mental Floss

“A Visit from St. Nicholas,” Clement Clark Moore, Poetry Foundation

ASL Nook YouTube channel

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Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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Thanksgiving

November 28, 2013

Thanksgiving

Native Americans brought corn chips and guacamole dip. Pilgrims brought pizza and beer. It was the first “fun” Thanksgiving.

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National Haiku Poetry Day

April 17, 2013

National Haiku Poetry Day

A single spring day
When our nation celebrates
Haiku Poetry

Expect more 17-syllable silliness. April 17th is National Haiku Poetry Day. April is National Poetry Month and today is the 17th (get it?).

Need English-language haiku more frequently than one day a year? Robot poets find them daily in the pages of the New York Times:

Times Haiku

More:

“Robots not replacing humankind, just writing haikus for Tumblr,” Kirsten Reach, mhpbooks.com

“Not an April Fool’s joke: The New York Times has built a haiku bot,” Justin Ellis, Nieman Journalism Lab

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Image (“Woman with iPad, after Hiroshige”) by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length

 

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iHowl, by Alan Ginsberg & Fernsy

August 5, 2012

iHowl, by Alan Ginsberg & Fernsy

“I saw the best minds of my generation in chat rooms with the worst minds of my generation destroyed by bad Yelp reviews and a troll on Angies list after failed ebay auction bids dragging themselves through google adwords looking for SEO optimization while stirring to Kelly Clarkson on Itunes.

Message t shirt donning hipsters burning for the extra cash to afford optimized DSL connections and emoticon responses that stave off acronym exhaustion. Sat up chewing nicotine gum in the LCD monitors earthy glow floating over contemplating John Travolta’s latest disgruntled masseuse. Sober on Setraline who bared their brains to Yahoo after passing the CAPTCHA under a clever seeming screenname and saw Mohammedan menaces make the TSA frisk them at LAX.”

More:

“iHowl- With Apologies to Allen Ginsberg,” Fernsy, The Definitive Blog

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Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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Higgs-Like Key to the Uni-Verse

July 6, 2012

More:

“Physicists Find Elusive Particle Seen as Key to Universe,” Dennis Overbye, New York Times

“Why the Higgsteria?” Ken Perrot, Open Parachute

“Higgsapalooza,” Steinn Sigurðsson, Dynamics of Cats

“Gettin’ Higgy With it: A Roundup of Higgs Boson Jokes on Twitter,” Xeni Jardin, Boing-Boing 

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Sumerian Suds

June 20, 2012

Sumerian Suds

Peter Damerow of the Max Planck Institute recently used an ancient Sumerian drinking song in his research on the brewing techniques of Mesopotamia. The song, from the 3rd millenium BC, was dedicated to a woman saloonkeeper and glorifies Ninkasi, goddess of brewing.

Excerpts:

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Aye, Bobbie Burns and the Library of Congress

January 25, 2012

Aye, Bobbie Burns and the Library of Congress

By now, no doubt, you’ve finished your haggis and neeps and drained a wee dram to toast the 253th Birthday of poet Robert Burns. The Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division has an online celebration of Scottish links for your post-Burns Supper perusal:

“Robert Burns Day: Haggis, Anyone?” Kristi Finefield, Picture This

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Image (“Robert Burns at the Library of Congress”) by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Subtle Safety for Bikes

December 3, 2011

Subtle Safety for Bikes

More of America’s city dwellers are trying bicycles, and that makes these trying times for bike riders, pedestrians and drivers alike. Bikes run into people, cars run into bikes, bikes run into cars. New York City is trying a novel approach to improve bike safety: poetry.

The NYC Department of Transportation has rolled out a new bicycle safety program, Curbside Haiku signs. The signs feature 12 designs, and each spells out bike safety tips in poems of 17 syllables. This official New York municipal program is based on an Atlanta guerrilla art project by John Morse.

The thoughtful Curbside Haiku poem cycle covers essential bicycle topics, all except one. This one:

Pedal with respect
The streets are for everyone
Spandex shorts are not

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