Posts Tagged ‘photography’

Iconic Skyscraper Photo: Staged Stunt

September 25, 2012

Iconic Skyscraper Photo: Staged Stunt

The iconic 1932 photo of construction workers eating lunch on a steel beam high above Rockefeller Center, attributed to Charles C. Ebbets, is considered a documentary classic. There are many tributes (like the Sergio Furnari sculpture above) and parodies. Corbus, which owns the photo rights to “Lunch Atop a Skyscraper,” says it’s licensed more often than any of the snaps in the firm’s 20-million-image catalog.

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A Sense of Place

November 30, 2011

DC Photographers Get Exposure

A Sense of Place
A member-juried show by The Exposure Group.

Photographs by Bonita F. Bing, Benson Blake, E. Carol Burns, Danita Delaney, Bruce Fagin, Lisa A. Fanning, Sharon Farmer, Michael Gross, Gail Hansberry, Donnamaria R. Jones, Gloria Kirk, Lionel Miller, Otis P. Motley, and Michael G. Smith.

Through December 3, 2011

The Center for Green Urbanism
3938 Benning Road NE
Washington, DC 20019
(202) 506-3867

Map

Gallery hours:
Tuesday — Friday 10AM to 5PM, Saturday 11AM to 4PM

More:

“Black photographers tell their stories,” Macy L. Freeman, The Root DC

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Short Link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-bIl

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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Unblinking Witness

March 16, 2011

Unblinking Witness

“The Kodak has been a sore calamity to us. The most powerful enemy indeed…. The only witness I have encountered in my long experience I couldn’t bribe.”
— Quotation from Mark Twain’s bitter satire “King Leopold’s Soliloquy” (1905) about the Belgian monarch behind unspeakable atrocities in the Congo.

Scott McLemee interviews NYU’s Susie Linfield, author of The Cruel Radiance: Photography and Political Violence in today’s InsideHigherEd.com

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Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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Kodachrome: Color it Gone

December 27, 2010

Kodachrome: Color it Gone

Eastman Kodak introduced Kodachrome photographic film in 1935, and ceased production in July 2009. The beloved color reversal film was a mainstay of magazine photojournalism and family snapshots (confidentially, some of us preferred Ektachrome and Fujicolor). The Kodachrome development process is complicated and requires professional handling and proprietary chemicals.

Now that the stock of film and chemicals is exhausted, the last Kodak-certified processor, Dwayne’s Photo of Parsons, Kansas, will stop developing Kodachrome film at the end of this month. National Geographic photographer Steve McCurry bought the last roll of Kodachrome ever produced; Dwayne’s Photo developed it in July.

That’s not the end of the story, though. The last decades of the 20th century will always look like Kodachrome.

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Exposure

August 20, 2010

Exposure

Photographer Roy Lewis began his professional career in 1964 when Jet magazine published his photo of Thelonius Monk.  Mr. Lewis was with Jet and Ebony before leaving Chicago for Washington in the 1970s to work for the Afro-American Newspapers, the Washington Informer, and as a freelance photographer. 

Roy Lewis has captured images of the African-American experience for a half century, across the country and beyond. In 1974, when Muhammad Ali fought George Foreman in Zaire, Roy Lewis was there with a camera.  No wonder his current exhibit at Gallery 110 is called “Everywhere with Roy Lewis.”

Everywhere with Roy Lewis
Gallery 110, Gateway Arts Center
3901 Rhode Island Avenue Brentwood, MD. 20722 (map)
Tuesday – Saturday: 10:00 am – 6:00 pm & Thursday 10:00 am – 7:00 pm
Free. For more information call (301) 209-0592

More:

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Spectrum of DC Art

August 13, 2010

Spectrum of DC Art

See the variety of DC’s visual art at the Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Gallery at Smith Farm Center today through Wednesday, August 25, 2010. The free exhibit features work by Washington artists applying for DC Arts Commission fellowships. This is a chance to see the latest painting, prints, photos and drawings by some of our favorites (Rex Weil, Rik Freeman, Roderick Turner, Elaine Langerman, Alec Simpson) as well as emerging artists. Sample works are on view here.

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Colors of Life

August 25, 2009

Colors of Life

The Colors of Life, a juried photography exhibition by members of Washington’s Exposure Group African American Photographers Association, runs through Friday, September 4, 2009, at the Charles Sumner School Museum & Archives (1201 17th Street, NW). There is no charge. Museum hours: Monday – Friday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

See an interview with Exposure Group members Sharon Farmer and George Tolbert here.

A new development: Colors of Life: the book. More on this soon.

 

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Presidents’ Day

February 16, 2009

President's Day
Photo: © Dale Lowery. All rights reserved; used with permission.

You may think today is “Presidents’ Day.” Not quite.

As the  U.S. Office of Personnel Management puts it:

This holiday is designated as “Washington’s Birthday” in section 6103(a) of title 5 of the United States Code, which is the law that specifies holidays for Federal employees. Though other institutions such as state and local governments and private businesses may use other names, it is our policy to always refer to holidays by the names designated in the law.

In 1968, Congress decided to recognize the birthdays of George Washington (February 22nd) and Abraham Lincoln (February 12th) on a single day, the third Monday in February, but rejected a new name for the holiday. 

Jurisdictions that did adopt the new name don’t agree on its punctuation. Presidents Day, President’s Day, or Presidents’ Day? No wonder Congress stayed out of it.

Happy Holiday.

 

Photo: “Jumbotron Inaugural, Obama Arrives.” © Dale Lowery, all rights reserved; used by permission. Dale says: “I snapped it from about 6th Street on the Mall on January 20th, as Mr. Obama entered the Capitol and they flashed him up on the Jumbotron, and I think it captures the electric excitement of the moment.” We agree. For more information, go to DaleLowery.com.