Posts Tagged ‘Minneapolis’

‘Good-night, sweet prince ….’

April 21, 2016


Version from the “Purple Rain” film soundtrack  here.

“Now cracks a noble heart. Good-night, sweet prince;
And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest. ”
Hamlet, Act V Scene ii

Prince Rogers Nelson, June 7, 1958 – April 21, 2016.

More:

“Prince Dead at 57,” Kory Grow, Rolling Stone

“Fans leave flowers, touch Prince’s star on First Avenue’s wall,” Katie Humphrey and Emma Nelson, Minneapolis Star-Tribune

“Beyond Raspberry Berets: What Prince Left Behind,” Erin Blakemore, Smithsonian

“We’ll Never Understand Prince, and That’s Why We Love Him, Brian Raftery, Wired

“Tributes to Prince spring up across the US,” Associated Press

“Purple Pain: World Front Pages Mourn Prince’s Death,” Worldcrunch

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The ‘Floating World’ of Minneapolis

October 31, 2011

The 'Floating World' of Miinneapolis

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts has 3,000 Japanese woodblock prints from the Edo period (1600–1868). These “pictures of the floating world”or ukiyo-e feature famous beauties, Kabuki actors, landscapes, floral studies, heroes, and spirits. The collection includes work by masters like Harunobu, Kiyonaga, Utamaro, Shunsho, Sharaku, Toyokuni, Hokusai, and Hiroshige.  Some of the best prints are on exhibit through January 8, 2012, along with the work of modern artists inspired by them.

Edo Pop: The Graphic Impact of Japanese Prints, Minneapolis Institute of Arts

“Eye-popping prints from Japan’s Edo period,” Emma Mustich, Salon
(An interview with exhibition curator Matthew Welch)

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Image (“Hummer in the Snow, after Torii Kotondo”) by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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