Posts Tagged ‘Mexico’

Big Brother Is Watching, Not Listening

September 24, 2012

Big Brother Is Watching, Not Listening

Oaxaca, Mexico has installed 230 video cameras downtown and in the suburbs, and most of them are monitored by deaf police personnel.  Oaxaca’s Deputy Secretary for the Ministry of Public Security noted that:

“…these police officers have a very strong … visual sense and can better detect what is happening in different places where the cameras are located; they can often remotely read the conversations of people, to the benefit of this security system that operates 24 hours a day.”

“Deaf Police Monitor Security Cameras,” Murray Page, Mazátlan Messenger

According to Vaughn Bell, “…there is good evidence that deaf people are better at noticing things in the periphery of vision and detecting movement.”

 “This potentially makes them perfect for the job and likely better than their hearing colleagues.

 So the project turns out to be a targeted way not of recruiting ‘disabled people’ into the workforce, but of recruiting the ‘super able’. In fact, turning the whole idea of disability on its head.”

“Deaf police to monitor security cameras in Mexico,” Vaughn Bell, Mind Hacks

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Seis de Mayo

May 6, 2012

Seis de Mayo
Last night, the 5th of May, millions of people commemorated the Mexican victory at the Battle of Puebla (1862) with volleys of shots — of tequila — bravura barrages of beer, and murderous margaritas. Unsurprisingly, this morning finds heads held hostage and stomachs seared from nacho napalm. Today’s Spanish vocabulary lesson: crudo means ” hangover.”

If you celebrated Cinco de Mayo with cerveza, celebrate Seis de Mayo this morning with el desayuno de los campeones, the Breakfast of Champions. The traditional Mexican hangover cure is menudo tripe soup or stew.

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Obligatory Cinco de Mayo Blog Post

May 5, 2012

Obligatory Cinco de Mayo Blog Post

Some years ago, correspondent Mickey Weems PhD was improving his Spanish and Zapotec, conducting anthropological foodways fieldwork, and supplementing his meager adjunct faculty wages by working at a Chipotle Mexican Grill in Columbus, Ohio. He also cooked up a tasty Spanglish writing style:

“One domingo a couple of semanas passadas, Ashley and Papi Tigre made chilaquile, a dish made with corn chips cooked in salsa and served with huevos, pollo, sour cream and guacamole. The chilaquile was caliente but too good to pass up. I now understand the purpose of sour cream, arroz, and guac in the scheme of Mexican cuisine: they calm the fuego.”

New York Times “Minimalist”  Mark Bittman, who gives a recipe for chilaquiles in How to Cook Everything Vegetarian, once caused a food fascist furor by using the term “taco chips” in a Travel Section piece about Mexico City. Variations of this dish, with and without meat, are popular throughout North America, and monolingual Norteamericanos call it “Mexican lasagna,” “Tortilla Casserole,” and ”Frito Pie.”

Regional, seasonal, and personal variations abound; cooks whip up what they like with what they’ve got. The word chilaquiles may have achieved a metaphorical meaning in U.S. Spanglish reminiscent of the Yiddish trope using tzimmes, the Jewish casserole dish, to mean ”big deal” or “big production.”

So if somebody calls tostadas “taco chips,” don’t make a big tzimmes, carnales.

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Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-d70

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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Walmart Introduces Foreign Aid Program

April 25, 2012

Walmart Introduces Foreign Aid Program

Stung by bad publicity because of its Chinese sweatshops, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. decided to institute its own foreign aid program, beginning south of the border with its Wal-Mart de Mexico branch. The corporation generously donated $24 million to our southern neighbor. Unfortunately, the financial assistance consisted of illegal bribes to obtain construction permits for its stores across the country, which currently number 2,099.

Who says? Sergio Cicero Zapata, the lawyer who was in charge of making Wal-Mart’s bribes. These payments aren’t just against Mexican law; they’re illegal in the USA under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the law prohibiting bribes to officials of other countries.

How did Wal-Mart react when an internal investigation found this pattern of corruption? With a cover-up.

More:

“8 Revelations From Walmart’s Mexican Bribery Scandal,” Andrew Carter and Matthew DeLuca, Daily Beast

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Short Link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-d3O

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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Mexican Immigration to USA: Net-Zero

April 10, 2012

“The population of undocumented immigrants in the US fell from 12 million to approximately 11 million during the height of the financial crisis (2008-09) …. And since then, Mexicans without documents aren’t migrating at rates to replace the loss, creating a net zero balance for the first time in 50 years.”

“Home again in Mexico: Illegal immigration hits net zero,” Sara Miller Llana, Christian Science Monitor (citing Douglas Massey, Mexican Migration Project, Princeton University)

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Short Link:    http://wp.me/p6sb6-cXU

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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US Police Export Guns to Mexican Drug Cartels

August 8, 2011

USA Police Export Guns to Mexico

The former mayor of Columbus, New Mexico has pleaded guilty to smuggling 200 guns across the U.S. border into Mexico to buyers in the La Línea drug cartel.  At least 12 of the weapons were used in murders. The 11 people charged with gun trafficking also include the Columbus police chief and a town trustee. The weapons, purchased from Arizona and New Mexico gun shops by “straw buyers,” were smuggled into Mexico using unmarked Columbus police vehicles.

The entire Columbus police force has been fired. Unfortunately, the firearms have been too, and people died.

Short link: http://wp.me/p6sb6-aOy

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not boring or obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Seis de Mayo

May 6, 2011

Seis de Mayo

Last night, the 5th of May, millions of people commemorated the Mexican victory at the Battle of Puebla (1862) with volleys of shots — of tequila — bravura barrages of beer, and murderous margaritas. Unsurprisingly, this morning finds heads held hostage and stomachs seared from nacho napalm. Today’s Spanish vocabulary lesson: crudo means ” hangover.”

 If you celebrated Cinco de Mayo with cerveza, celebrate Seis de Mayo this morning with el desayuno de los campeones, the Breakfast of Champions. The traditional Mexican hangover cure is menudo tripe soup or stew.

(more…)

March 6, 1836. The Alamo. Remember?

March 6, 2011

March 6, 1836

March 6, 1836. The Battle of the Alamo. Remember? Gregory McNamee does:

“One hundred and seventy-five years ago, on March 6, 1836, some two hundred American immigrants died trying to secure the liberation of Texas from the sovereign nation of Mexico. They met their fate at an adobe mission in the heart of a little town called San Antonio, named El Alamo for the tall cottonwood trees surrounding it, a place that the Virginian Sam Houston had encouraged them to abandon in favor of a more easily defended place. James Bowie, William Travis, David Crockett, and their militiamen held out for almost two weeks, but in the end they indeed could not defend the low-walled mission, and a Mexican army led by Antonio López de Santa Anna overwhelmed them.”

— “Remembering the Alamo,” Gregory McNamee, Britannica Blog.

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Smugglers’ Siege Engine Propels Pot

February 25, 2011

 Smugglers' Siege Engine Propels Pot

Chivalry may be dead, but the Middle Ages are alive on the Mexican Border. Federales found a catapult used by drug smugglers to propel pot over the border fence and into the Arizona desert.  Cops captured the catapult and cannabis but the flingers fled. Anybody missing from the Centro de Estudios Medievales at the Universidad de Sonora?

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Day of the Dead – El Día de los Muertos

November 1, 2010

  Day of the Dead - El Día de los Muertos

The Day of the Dead (El Día de los Muertos) or All Souls Day is November 2st this year, a Tuesday. Here in Washington, DC the Mexican Cultural Institute (Instituto de México, 2829 16th Street, NW) has a traditional Altar de Muertos, which also commemorates the centennial of the Mexican Revolution.

The day is well-appreciated on the Web. Start with Carlos Miller and the staff of the Arizona Republic; for more detail, see Skulls to the Living, Bread to the Dead by Stanley Brandes.

 

Image by Mike Licht. Download a copy here. Creative Commons license; credit Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Comments are welcome if they are on-topic, substantive, concise, and not obscene. Comments may be edited for clarity and length.

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