Posts Tagged ‘1963’

1963 March on Washington: 80,000 Cheese Sandwiches

August 28, 2013

1963 March on Washington: 80,000 Cheese Sandwiches

“In New York, volunteers showed up at the Riverside Church at 3:00 AM to make bagged lunches. The bagged meal, comprised of a cheese sandwich, mustard, marble cake and an apple, could be purchased by marchers for 50 cents. Working in shifts until 4 in the afternoon, the assembly line crew paused once for a few words from Dr. Robert Spike, director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches: ‘As an act of love, we now dedicate these lunches for the nourishment of thousands who will be coming long distances, at great sacrifice to say with their bodies and souls that we shall overcome.’ In all, 5 tons of American cheese went into the 80,000 lunches that were loaded onto refrigerated trucks and shipped down to Washington.”

— “Eating on the March: Food at the 1963 March on Washington,” Smithsonian Magazine blog [links added]

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The 1963 March on Washington Started in 1941

August 28, 2013

The 1963 March on Washington Started in 1941

The Civil Rights demonstration on August 28, 1963 was called the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Jobs came first, since the right to vote means little without job opportunity and a living wage. The event, produced in 8 weeks, had really been 22 years in the making. A. Philip Randolph of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters planned such a march for equal employment opportunity in 1941, and was only dissuaded when President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 8802, banning job discrimination in the World War II defense industries.

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‘Ue o Muite Arukō’ (Sukiyaki)

June 29, 2013

'Ue o Muite Arukō' Sukiyaki
In June 1963 a Japanese-language record spent three weeks at the top of the Billboard charts. Few Americans knew what pop idol Kyû Sakamoto was singing about or the real name of the song, but the wistful tune was catchy, and the emotion evident. The song, written by Hachidai Nakamura with lyrics by Rokusuke Ei, was “Ue o Muite Arukō” (“I Shall Walk Looking Up”) but in the USA it was called “Sukiyaki” since that was a Japanese word Americans knew.

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